Exploiting bacteriophages for human health

Exploiting bacteriophages for human health Whenever I write about phage therapy – using bacteriophages to treat bacterial infections – readers get overly enthusiastic about injecting patients with phages to produce a miracle cure. Look at it this way – that hasn’t worked for the last 100 years and it’s not likely to suddenly start working now. This short review is worth reading because it takes a much more thoughtful and holistic approach to the idea of phage therapy than the simple minded “phage as wonder cure” idea.

Exploiting gut bacteriophages for human health. Trends Microbiol. 20 Mar 2014 pii: S0966-842X(14)00045-6. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2014.02.010
The human gut contains approximately 1015 bacteriophages (the ‘phageome’), probably the richest concentration of biological entities on earth. Mining and exploiting these potential ‘agents of change’ is an attractive prospect. For many years, phages have been used to treat bacterial infections in humans and more recently have been approved to reduce pathogens in the food chain. Phages have also been studied as drug or vaccine delivery vectors to help treat and prevent diseases such as cancer and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. Individual phageomes vary depending on age and health, thus providing a useful biomarker of human health as well as suggesting potential interventions targeted at the gut microbiota.

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